3 Minutes to Midnight

For a while now, a composition has been in the works to encapsulate an imagining of end times. A feeling of collapse one may retreat to in an attempted understanding of the world we inhabit and the world on horizon. 

Today marks the release of said endeavor. Titled 3 Minutes to Midnight, in light of the famous clock forecasting proximity to the end of the world; this piece is not meant to ground you or provide escape for what is certainly coming. This is a sound experiment of experience - a presentation of what it may be when the last 57 minutes of existence do take shape. An accounting of last breaths, imagining a blink out with the last 3 minutes of the last hour silent, nothingness, as something new directs course to an unknown destination.

This is collapse. Either by climate change, nuclear impulse, or some unforeseen decimation. The pings of signal flare outs, reverberations of metal, and the desolation of noise. Let the movie play in your head as the sound washes over you. Waves upon waves of absoluteness. Let "[t]he images dies as soon as they are created...dispelled by the very light they cast...like a spring constantly compressed and constantly released, that carries all time within itself and consumes it there and then."

Murder in the Dark Album Release

We are really excited to announce that as of today This Line has a new album and a new video. This has been long in the mix and we are really excited for more people to finally listen. Check out the new video below! Stream and download the album at Bandcamp.

KCRW #RadioRace

This weekend we are making a go at the KCRW #RadioRace. Stellar event bringing in exceptional producers from all around with some great ears behind the judging table. Besides eventually getting a new piece from us, what exactly does this mean for you?

Well, you get to track our progress. Social media is stressed by KCRW - so much so that an award is given for best use - so we will be representing. You may have noticed some extensive use of the desired hashtag aRound Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

weird photos

odd assortments of words

usual nonsense

We are going to be very busy and probably overly tired. So, you must give us a pass as we try to entertain while live documenting what is not necessarily a unique experience for us (we have made pieces in shorter time spans), but usually happens quietly in our confines. 

Enjoy the ride and have no fear, Sunday will still bring you a new episode of The White Whale. It's already in the bag. 

 

#PM15

If you follow our social media accounts you'll know we are spending this weekend amongst audio greats at Podcast Movement. First time visiting this particular conference, and already excited for the next one. Yes, they have it set.

This kicks off a couple busy weeks as we are continuing to put out The White Whale every Sunday, have some work for other shows in the mix and are playing participant to the 24-hour Radio Race from KCRW next weekend. Yes, we have asked ourselves what we are doing. Too fun to take that reality check. 

If you are new to our podcast as of #PM15 please take a listen in whatever order you please. First season is chronological, but as conversation of the records and films speaks to listening and watching in whatever order you please we have designed each episode to be part of a larger whole that can be heard unto itself.

Cheers to all following and participating in this crazy business. We are having fun. If looking for us tonight we will probably be mixing some radio somewhere in the ether. Feel free to steal attention. 

Keep Moving Forward

There is a lot of work on the horizon as we round the corner of summer into August. Not only is The White Whale's first season wrapping up in a couple weeks, but we're honored to be contributing to a few other productions for which we are long-time fans.  

After the season ends we'll have a slight break. An album collecting original music from the first season is being whittled down. Something we're excited to release, but there is a lot to go through.

We'll also have some one-off productions covering the work of people we love. That's a secret we will hold for now though.  

Second season is already under-way as well, though it's subject is still ours to tell. While its approach and aesthetic will be much in line with the first season, this is also going to be a very different experience and very different story. Much more dealing with a particular perspective of the last half century and how it changed the world. Pretty rich and cool stuff. Not a story we imagine you have heard.

What else? What else? 

Surely there is more, but the audio world seems enough to highlight for the moment. We just released the newest music video from Scott Wooldridge, something many years in the making, and have a few other tricks up our sleeve in that end. There may be some fiction we wish to visualize as all this audio work is really presenting new worlds and wouldn't mind finally releasing some new photography from the last few years. See if we find the time. 

Long Time GONE

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

It's been a while since we have updated. 

 

We have not forgotten you. 

 

Event Horizons

If you follow us on Twitter, Facebook, or Google+ you know we are very busy. Anxious Machine's second season has started and our remix for ARRVLS is in the airwaves. We also had a big hand in the recent episode of SisterStory Presents: with Jo Piazza. A lot of music and producing went into making that happen. 

There is also a lot coming down the road including a new music video for Scott Wooldridge as well as some others. The White Whale is kicking strong and growing a larger fan base everyday - but that is closer to its season end rather than beginning. We are going to fill that space with some different one- off radio docs as we prepare the second season. That is going to be a pretty different narrative, but built upon similar foundations. 

This post specifically though is about a new mixtape American Residue Records is dropping tomorrow. Called Event Horizons, if you have heard any of the recent podcast episodes we have been a part of then you have heard some pieces.  These have quickly gained some listeners so time to release.

follow our channels for all the updates and look for the new record tomorrow! 

Études

We have a new album coming out tomorrow - solo release by Garrett called Études.

According to Wikipedia,

An étude (/ ˈeɪtjuːd/; French pronunciation:  [eˈtyd], a French word meaning study) is an instrumental musical composition, usually short, of considerable difficulty, and designed to provide practice material for perfecting a particular musical skill. The tradition of writing études emerged in the early 19th century with the rapidly growing popularity of the piano. Of the vast number of études from that era some are still used as teaching material (particularly pieces by Carl Czerny and Muzio Clementi), and a few, by major composers such as Frédéric ChopinFranz Liszt and Claude Debussy, achieved a place in today's concert repertory. Études written in the 20th century include those related to traditional ones (György Ligeti), those that require wholly unorthodox technique (John Cage), and ones that are unusually easy to play.

Our version of this idea is a first release of some of the original music you have been hearing on The White Whale as well as podcast episodes produced for the oral history project SisterStory. Engineered by John R. Barner, these are not as you heard them in the podcast, but developed variants that allow new life and new ideas.

We just released our newest episode of The White Whale and are hard at work on Sunday's release as we prepare for the MEGAPOLIS Audio Festival (http://megapolisfestival.org). We will also be releasing a new Mixtape shortly called Event Horizons. Lots of great material! Keep checking Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to the podcast!

 

FUNAYŪREI - A Reflection

by John R. Barner

About midway through mixing down the tracks on Hikikomori, the machines began to “talk back.” This is the only way I can describe the mixes beginning to augment relatively independently in the computer software. Often I would spend several days away from a mix, either getting busy with life outside of recording or taking time to think about a particular song’s structure or sound. When I would return to the song, there would be changes that I didn’t remember making in the recording process. Sometimes subtle—a bit of echo on a beat, for example—that was easily explained when in the midst of tweaking levels of effects. Others, however, were drastic and many of the songs on Funayūrei contain elements that I genuinely don’t remember adding or enhancing. It was actually quite creepy at times! The phenomena occurred enough that I began to research technical reasons why it could be happening, but turned up nothing to explain everything I was hearing. I did, however, revisit a few creative instances where sounds ended up on a recording without easy explanation. During the recording of Joy Division’s final album, Closer, producer Martin Hannett remarked once to Rolling Stone magazine that the piano line on the song “The Eternal” would be heard through control room monitors when there was no one playing the piano or even in the recording room.

John Balance and Peter Christopherson of the band Coil recorded a side project entitled ElpH. The central creative conceit of the resulting Worship the Glitch, is described in band’s Wikipedia page as “random musical compositions that were generated from their own equipment, either by itself or as an unintended yet pleasant byproduct of their own work” although Balance and Christopherson would often say that they felt these “random musical compositions” were anything but, and seemed to be “transmitted” by somewhere or something. After uncovering these examples, I let the machines (or whatever force was using them) take over and much of what made the final mixes remains unedited. Funayūrei was intended to be the darkest of the records and the most evocative of the traditional ghost story. In Japanese mythology, the funayūrei are the spirits of those who have drowned or died violently at sea and are seen as acting malevolently so that seafarers will join them in their watery afterlife. Reading these myths and legends were incredibly inspiring to both realizing my vision for the music and the recording process itself, which evolved to sampling and making field recordings of water in various forms and incorporating electronic voice phenomena or EVP—static field recordings said to capture ghostly voices.

For the latter, I was able to access several publicly available archives of EVP first broadcast on the Coast to Coast AM radio program once hosted by paranormal enthusiast Art Bell, which I first heard many years ago on a road trip to California. From these disparate elements, the final part of the Yōkai Trilogy was born.

LINKS:

Coil vs. ElpH, Worship the Glitch: https://youtu.be/WUp8tUlftW8

Art Bell on EVPs from Coast to Coast AM: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA0978912DC43800D

Funayūrei Cover Art

We released the cover art for John's third act tonight. Album is set for release Tuesday and as per the other releases we have films lined up. Next few weeks should be exciting as we send all this material out in the world. 

This has been a long road and it's not over yet. The podcast has lots more material to cover - we just introduced this album, but we're going to travel back a bit so we're nowhere near the end. There are the upcoming films too.

And...John has talked of a special edition Trilogy release that would feature additional material not on the separate records.

We'll see what happens, but while this is an end in some regards, it's also just a beginning.

 

 

Hikikomori - A Reflection

by John R. Barner

My second story idea revolved around the amount of what I call spiritual investment in our online presence. I use the word “spiritual” in a very general sense, and not indicative of faith traditions as such but rather those emotions that seem to define who we are as people: our personalities, hopes, dreams, needs for attention or consolation, our ups and downs, what we value and what we hope is valued in us by others. Hence, the great amount of time spent on “investment” in tools like computers and social media, which, if all is well, we get a “return” on, be in the form of “likes” or “retweets” or “friends.” But often we seek that kind of return, that “connection” and sense of community at the expense of real human interaction. What if that was all that was left? Only those digital traces cast adrift in the void of cyberspace—incorporeal and disembodied—that are today’s technological ghosts in the machines that connect our world.

I remembered immediately the Kate Bush song, “Deeper Understanding” from her amazing 1989 album The Sensual World (and later revisited on 2011’s Director’s Cut). The song was so eerily prescient about today’s technologically-informed social life and laid the foundation, in many ways, to the story I wanted to tell.

Another burst of information and inspiration came again from Rutledge’s Kūhaku. The hikikomori are the socially isolated youth of Japan. Government figures from 2010 suggest there are more than 700,000 individuals, most under the age of thirty, who live completely isolated lives, rarely, if ever, venturing out in the world and completely cut off from many forms of social life like family, friends, school or work. Many hikikomori get family support or are able to earn a living or have a solitary social outlet through computers, be it gaming, e-commerce, or virtual living spaces such as Second Life, but their lives are often filled with debilitating depression and psychic pain and the phenomenon can last for years, decades, or potentially the rest of their lives. I felt a tremendous resonance between what I was developing as a story idea and the tales I heard of the hikikomori. I was particularly impacted by a story I heard from a young woman who was the older sister of a hikikomori. In an interview, she stated that she empathized with her brother, and even respected his isolation, even if it meant he would not attend the funeral of their grandmother, but admitted that she herself suffered from an acute anxiety that the world itself might go out of existence and her brother would never know. It was as if, she said, he was already gone, already a ghost.


LINKS:

BBC News: “Hikikomori in Japan”: https://youtu.be/dr5y1iP9TfU

Kate Bush, “Deeper Understanding” (1989): https://youtu.be/q2HsN9WLQhI

Kate Bush, “Deeper Understanding” (2011), Official Music Video: https://youtu.be/nzqF_gBpS84

The Yokai Trilogy - A Reflection

by John R. Barner

Yōkai, in Japanese, means “ghost” or “apparition” and the distinction holds a particular pride of place in Japanese folklore and literary culture. The earliest beginnings of this project had to do with ghost stories, or telling stories with ghostly or supernatural elements in them. So the name fits, I suppose, but it is stripped of almost all the rich cultural history and color, reduced to its most literal sense. When I first started this project, I did not even know it would involve music but I remained committed to the idea of conceiving of one or more stories (written, recited, or performed) that had ghosts in them. And not just any ghosts, but particular ghosts that haunt us now. Before even starting, I had thought that the very idea of the ghost story was a tired one, lacking in color, creativity or anything I felt was unique or engaging. Everything seemed to have been done. For five months I mostly railed against what I saw represented in mainstream American and European popular culture around the idea of the ghost or ghost story. I re-read Poe, Hawthorne, James, Blackwood, Machen, Collins, Lovecraft, Doyle, Dickens, Shakespeare, and many other literary and dramatic representations. I watched films like Paranormal Activity and television series like Ghost Hunters—and still nothing felt right. Most often, I was left with versions of the same questions. Why was it, even in today’s modern conception of the ghost story, that the spirit in question either an unseen force of some kind, or some representative of a bygone era—the Victorian “woman in black” or avenging Civil War-era soldier? What would a ghost be like who had just become a ghost yesterday? Someone who surfed the Net, listened to Top 40 radio, and watched YouTube videos. I frequently asked myself if such questions were themselves silly and I more than once felt like The Maitlands, the young couple played by Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis in the 1988 film, Beetlejuice who are repeatedly chagrined to find their quotidian afterlife is never interesting or scary enough, in the traditional sense. Played for laughs in the film, I think it really says something about the Western conception of death and what lies beyond death that we, as a society, don’t really want to explore on some level, but are drawn to just the same. We want to be scared (and entertained by our fear, as it were) but we certainly don’t want to confront death on any level, therefore relegating the more frightening aspects always at some remove. For the Maitlands, it’s found in the more traditionally ghoulish and grotesque title character—for us it’s the invisible monsters, or the vestiges of the ancient, historical or unknown. It’s never us we should be afraid of.  I think it was these persistent questions that finally led me to try to tell a series of ghost stories using only contemporary, mostly electronic, music and sounds. I reasoned this would, at least, be an attempt to answer the question. At the end of five months of research, I had three ideas, roughly sketched, and I started to work. 

Site Re-designs

For those who check out the site regularly rather than just our social media outlets, you may have noticed some changes in the last few days. Some were necessary as we identified certain elements that were not working on all platforms. However, this need also brought about opportunity to better emphasize what's becoming a big focus of our time - podcasting.

The Yōkai Trilogy page has gotten some attention as we are continuing to build toward the release of the third record and where the story will go after - look to The White Whale as a good starting point. We are currently producing the films to coincide with the album release and are recording some conversation with John to better investigate how this year's work came about.

Life is divided into three terms - that which was, which is, and which will be. Let us learn from the past to profit by the present, and from the present to live better in the future.
— William Wordsworth

We've also got some terrific music videos in the works and maybe some film ideas developing out of the amazing audio work we have been producing lately. So, the section devoted to these highlights might get some more attention in coming months as we are trying to not only highlight the product of hard work, but the process as well. This has always been of significant import for us, but with The White Whale we are seeing possibilities to better pull back the curtain a bit without completely unveiling the mystery.

All to say that we are ever evolving. We want to keep highlighting our many productions without creating a mess of a site. We've taken off the direct links to various writing platforms for the moment - if that is annoying let us know. But, Minnesota Public Radio being the current highlight for our cultural critique, a direct link to MPR can be found in Transistors with the podcast presentation.

For now we are off - to the races.

Be looking for us on the airwaves and video screens wherever you find them.

The White Whale

We've finally launched our podcast! It's exciting. We were planing to wait a bit on these as we are in production on content right now, but we got the name and did the artwork and just couldn't wait.

First episode may seem light on content, but considering the development of CyNar and the various ideas we tend to embrace it felt like the right way to get things started.

Take a listen and subscribe on Soundcloud. We should be in iTunes soon as well. There is lots more content to follow soon.


Updates from the Curtain

It's been quite a while since we've written. So what's up in the CyNar world?

A lot actually. Looks like we'll be shooting some work for Hanan in the coming weeks. Plans are sounding good and it should prove to provide some beautiful imagery to go along with their amazing music.

Our podcast is starting to gear up. Trying to decide on a title and other details to help frame it, but the project is happening and should prove to be a pretty cool peak behind the curtain.

Work on our label is starting to make the rounds quite a bit in podcast land with the oral history project SisterStory making heavy use. A new episode of Curve Riders by the St. Catherine University student Alexa Harnagel featured the track Parts Hopeful.

And an episode of Set Apart by St. Catherine University student Lily Jacobson was released today featuring two tracks from the American Residue Records Presents: arrangement.

So, yeah. Things are kicking in this world. We also have a few things on the negotiation table that might happen this year and would be really cool so stay tuned. We will keep you informed.

In the meantime share with the world. Help keep us going. 

Set Apart Episode 103 - Barrier Breaker

Just a quick note here. The newest episode of Set Apart again features some music from American Residue Records. Go check it out if you have a chance. There are some interesting stories being produced by the oral history project SisterStory.

Find the latest episode in Soundcloud or watch in YouTube below.

Set Apart Podcast Episode 102 - Special Treatment

Before we can get started with our own podcast, we've found ourselves in the worlds of others. The recently begun Here's My Secret has a theme song by Garrett Tiedemann and a new podcast mini-series called Set Apart  also by the oral history project SisterStory has just started and amidst the layers of sound and other music you may hear familiar material if you have listened to our previous releases.

From what we here there will be some other appearances in other productions of some new original work in addition to previously released material so stay tuned.

For now, check out this second episode on Soundcloud or YouTube and see if you can hear us in the mix. Cheers!

Hikikomori 4

The final film for us to complete - Hikikomori 4 - took shape when a particular focus was discovered near the end. This allowed a certain amount of re-cutting to elevate it's presence and discover something buried deep in the frame.

Hikikomori 3

This film was released quite a bit ago, but with the new films coming out this week it seemed fitting to re-highlight the first two for the sake of continuity, and because why not?

As said before, the point of this work with John has always been to create unique pieces that would stand alone, but within the context of the larger structure create something valuable. Hikikomori and the larger Yokai Trilogy is becoming something quite wondrous and unique. We are hoping to do more with it, but this is the start.

With that said take a look (or re-look) at Hikikomori 3.